email marketing

What Came First: The Marketing or The Lead


If you ask the Marketing Department, every lead is a result of their efforts. Conversely, if you ask the Agents at the office, every lead just so happened to find their way to the Agent’s iPhone. So, to answer this question I will give two quick examples of lead generation situations.

  1. A prospective buyer sees the newest issue of <your city here> Magazine. The prospect sees the advertisement for your Real Estate Firm and calls to buy a property.
  2. A previous client calls an agent at your firm on their iPhone and buys a property.

In Example 1. The Marketing Department wins!

In Example 2. The Agent wins!

But wait… In Example 2, does the Agent win? In the book Never Lose Again: Become a Top Negotiator by Asking the Right Questions the first question is “How did you hear about us?” This question is of most importance to the Marketing Department. This question can answer what marketing dollars are being well spent. Additionally, a revision of this question can be asked of previous clients, “What made you call me?” Considering the client already knows about your real estate firm, what made them (a.) remember you out of all the other agents in the world, (b.) what was the call to action that prompted the client to call you?

Ha! In Example 2. Marketing wins again.

Marketing Departments not only create content to procure new buyers, but they also create “drip marketing” to stay in the forefront of the client’s mind. The moral of the story is, Marketing behind the enemy lines, creating an arsenal of marketing weapons to utilize on the company’s behalf to keep clients engaged and active. Next time a client or a prospect calls you, ask the right questions and determine where your marketing efforts are having the greatest return.

“The Boy Who Cried ‘Wolf'”

The Boy Who Cried Wolf (character design)

To start, here is the story of the “Boy Who Cried ‘Wolf. ‘“ If you know the story, just skip over it and get to the good stuff.

There was once a young Shepherd Boy who tended his sheep at the foot of a mountain near a dark forest. It was rather lonely for him all day, so he thought upon a plan by which he could get a little company and some excitement. He rushed down towards the village calling out “Wolf, Wolf,” and the villagers came out to meet him, and some of them stopped with him for a considerable time. This pleased the boy so much that a few days afterwards he tried the same trick, and again the villagers came to his help. But shortly after this a Wolf actually did come out from the forest, and began to worry the sheep, and the boy of course cried out “Wolf, Wolf,” still louder than before. But this time the villagers, who had been fooled twice before, thought the boy was again deceiving them, and nobody stirred to come to his help. So the Wolf made a good meal off the boy’s flock, and when the boy complained, the wise man of the village said:

“A liar will not be believed, even when he speaks the truth.”

http://etc.usf.edu/lit2go/35/aesops-fables/375/the-boy-who-cried-wolf/

Everyday. No fail, everyday, I receive multiple, unsolicited emails about great deals on any and all properties all over the world. While in theory, many of the properties may be good deals… just not to me. There is such a thing a building a relationship with a client and understanding what they like and want to buy. If someone is interested in Restaurant properties, or may even buy restaurant properties, does not mean that they should be emailed every restaurant ever listed. The major risk behind email blasting blindly is the basis behind the “Boy Who Cried Wolf.” Once there is actually a really good deal on a Restaurant property that fits the specific needs of a client, it’s too late. They have already designated the email to go straight to trash/junk/bulk/spam/etc. The moral of the story, know the client or potential client; know their needs, wants, and buying motives; only send them stuff that they are actually interested in. Think rifle, not shotgun.